The Latest

Apr 23, 2014 / 2 notes

Last week we talked about repurposing vintage luggage as a dog or cat bed. Take initiative on another luggage project while your furry friend is enjoying his or her new environment. Tell a personal story or adventure by turning an old luggage into a shadowbox. A shadowbox is a framed box with an enclosed glass front containing significant objects or sentimental treasures. It usually has a central theme that represents all displayed objects. Shadowboxes are not always used as personal artistic pieces by people. As a tradition, the military has a long history of presenting shadowboxes to people in service to acknowledge their achievements and advancements.

What would you put in your shadowbox? Or if you have one, what theme did you go with? Tweet us @arch_antiques!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

Apr 23, 2014 / 2 notes

Cool, old wallpaper prints on the back of a buffet driving us mad - beautiful!

Apr 23, 2014 / 2 notes

The possibilities are endless when you acquire hundreds and hundreds of foundry molds!

Our doors are always opened #nicebreeze #freshair #goodweather
Apr 21, 2014

Our doors are always opened #nicebreeze #freshair #goodweather

Fire grenades were the earliest fire extinguishers used for domestic fire protection and are now rare collectible antiques. The first fire grenade patent was issued to Alanson Crane in 1863. Manufacturers began producing large grenade quantities in unique glass shapes. A fire grenade was a transparent glass globe filled with saltwater or carbon tetrachloride. The thin layer was designed to break easily when thrown into a fire base, where it would explode and release extinguishing contents. A fire grenade’s content was filled with toxic chemicals, which could cause a harmful reaction in big fires. Fire grenades were recommended to be thrown into a smaller fire as they could completely eliminate the fire. They were securely placed in a bracket and mounted on walls and ceilings in the basement, bedroom, or attic of homes. Fire grenades were common features in houses, schools, factories, trains, and hotels. The grenade production slowed down in 1905 when safer fire extinguishers were invented.
As mentioned, fire grenades come in unique glass shapes and forms and are no longer in production. These ruby red enameled glass fire grenades pictured here are available at Architectural Antiques.
- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques
Sources:
Levy, Joeal. Really Useful: The Origins of Everyday Things. Ontario: Firefly Books, 2002. 146. Print.
Polak, Michael. Antique Trader Bottles Identification & Price Guide. Iola: Krause Publications, 2010. 174-175. Print.
Apr 21, 2014 / 4 notes

Fire grenades were the earliest fire extinguishers used for domestic fire protection and are now rare collectible antiques. The first fire grenade patent was issued to Alanson Crane in 1863. Manufacturers began producing large grenade quantities in unique glass shapes. A fire grenade was a transparent glass globe filled with saltwater or carbon tetrachloride. The thin layer was designed to break easily when thrown into a fire base, where it would explode and release extinguishing contents. A fire grenade’s content was filled with toxic chemicals, which could cause a harmful reaction in big fires. Fire grenades were recommended to be thrown into a smaller fire as they could completely eliminate the fire. They were securely placed in a bracket and mounted on walls and ceilings in the basement, bedroom, or attic of homes. Fire grenades were common features in houses, schools, factories, trains, and hotels. The grenade production slowed down in 1905 when safer fire extinguishers were invented.

As mentioned, fire grenades come in unique glass shapes and forms and are no longer in production. These ruby red enameled glass fire grenades pictured here are available at Architectural Antiques.

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques


Sources:

Levy, Joeal. Really Useful: The Origins of Everyday Things. Ontario: Firefly Books, 2002. 146. Print.

Polak, Michael. Antique Trader Bottles Identification & Price Guide. Iola: Krause Publications, 2010. 174-175. Print.

Wow, who baked and designed this #wedding #cake? It’s clearly not an edible one! #chandelier #light #fixture
Apr 21, 2014 / 3 notes

Wow, who baked and designed this #wedding #cake? It’s clearly not an edible one! #chandelier #light #fixture

Butler’s pantries emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in upper class and upper-middle class English and American homes. They are beautiful, architectural utility cabinetry and differ from original pantries specifically used for storing bread. People installed butler’s pantries between the kitchen and dining area. They stored valuable silver and dishes in these pantries. A butler’s pantry in wealthy households was traditionally maintained by a butler, who spent most nights sleeping by the pantry to protect and guard silver from thievery. It was also traditionally used for food presentation and cooling hot meals before serving.
Apr 18, 2014 / 1 note

Butler’s pantries emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in upper class and upper-middle class English and American homes. They are beautiful, architectural utility cabinetry and differ from original pantries specifically used for storing bread. People installed butler’s pantries between the kitchen and dining area. They stored valuable silver and dishes in these pantries. A butler’s pantry in wealthy households was traditionally maintained by a butler, who spent most nights sleeping by the pantry to protect and guard silver from thievery. It was also traditionally used for food presentation and cooling hot meals before serving.

Hey, let’s play I Spy .. I spy three French windows at the Mason Jar.
Wonder where they came from. Hmm.
*ponders*
Apr 16, 2014

Hey, let’s play I Spy .. I spy three French windows at the Mason Jar.

Wonder where they came from. Hmm.

*ponders*

You’re the best @colectivocoffee - thanks for stopping by with coffee and love!
Apr 14, 2014

You’re the best @colectivocoffee - thanks for stopping by with coffee and love!

Apr 14, 2014 / 27 notes

These charming American Tourister (left - brown) and Samsonite (right - blue) luggage are historical pieces from the 1960s. We don’t normally carry vintage luggage in our inventory and are always excited to receive unique items. The luggage may be too fragile to be traveling across the globe with you, but there are fun, innovative ways to restore them. I stumbled upon the idea of repurposing luggage as dog or cat beds. Repurposing can be approached differently depending on style preference. You can unscrew the hinges to detach the suitcase in two pieces (two beds, score!) or use it as one piece. Adding table legs may require more installation such as using metal plates, threads, screwdriver, and a drill. Create the bed using a pillow, cushion, or thick foam padding with comfortable fabric.

These faux-leather, plastic, metal luggage make the perfect bed for your pet. Personalize it with your pet’s name and favorite things!

Who do you think wore the pet bed better? Dogs or cats? Let us know at @arch_antiques!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

Mirror, mirror who’s the fairest of ‘em all? Check yourself out in this #ornate frame and beveled #mirror from the early 1900s.
Apr 14, 2014

Mirror, mirror who’s the fairest of ‘em all? Check yourself out in this #ornate frame and beveled #mirror from the early 1900s.

Apr 11, 2014

Uranium Glass

Architectural Antiques puts heart into quality light restoration – chandeliers, fixtures, sconces – and we believe we’re the best at it in Minnesota’s metropolitan area. We make old items come to life and we’re passionate about making every piece our best work. We recently restored a half-painted uranium bowl-glass chandelier salvaged from Youngstown, Ohio. Our light shop specialist, Will, mended the glass and stripped black paint off the exterior. We’re thrilled to have restored it to its original form.

Uranium glass was first produced in Europe in the 19th century as a technique for color yellow glass. Production was suspended for less than two decades during World War II due to toxic lead concern. It resumed after that period with low production of depleted uranium. Uranium glass radioactive levels are low and average in normal exposure.

Uranium glass adopted the name ‘Vaseline glass’ in the 20th century but the nickname is debatable. Although Vaseline glass and uranium glass have similar features, Vaseline glass has less uranium oxide content that creates transparency compared to opaque uranium glass with higher uranium oxide content. Due to chemical reaction, uranium glass glows pale green during daylight and fluoresces neon green or yellow-green under an ultra violet light or back light.

Despite emitting low levels of radioactive materials, early Europeans experimented with uranium glass and produced different colors. Antique uranium glass are aesthetic pieces embodying unique color. Look at the before-and-after pictures of the uranium chandelier and you’ll notice the difference in lighting and restoration.

What a difference! And it glows! Proved ourselves right that it’s #radioactive by lighting a regular bulb and an #uv bulb. Pure #uranium glass.
Apr 11, 2014

What a difference! And it glows! Proved ourselves right that it’s #radioactive by lighting a regular bulb and an #uv bulb. Pure #uranium glass.

Apr 9, 2014 / 10 notes

Last week we talked about creating a mini-garden using pop crates with pockets. There are many other innovative pop crate purposes. Examples we found include décor/accent, light bulbs, spice rack, arts and crafts materials, and dessert display. Sea shell and letter accents are nice additional touches to a washroom, bathroom, or hallway. The round light bulb idea is unique and striking – I can imagine it hanging on a ceiling or in a walk-in closet. A labeled spice rack mounted on the kitchen wall is great organization. It’s easy access during prepping and cooking a meal (no more opening cabinets!). Maybe you’ll even memorize where the spices are located on the crate. Arts and crafts supplies pile up and can get messy overtime. In a crate, they’re all in one place and can be sorted by colors, types of purpose, ribbons, threads, and trim. Pop crates make fun dessert holders and displays at outdoor events. However you choose to display them, they add a simple vintage touch.

Tweet us your favorite repurpose pop crate project or share one we don’t have here @arch_antiques!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

Apr 7, 2014

These are amazing pieces. Can’t believe we have a hundred different #foundry #molds and patterns. #industrial #steampunk #rustic