The Latest

You’re the best @colectivocoffee - thanks for stopping by with coffee and love!
Apr 14, 2014

You’re the best @colectivocoffee - thanks for stopping by with coffee and love!

Apr 14, 2014 / 24 notes

These charming American Tourister (left - brown) and Samsonite (right - blue) luggage are historical pieces from the 1960s. We don’t normally carry vintage luggage in our inventory and are always excited to receive unique items. The luggage may be too fragile to be traveling across the globe with you, but there are fun, innovative ways to restore them. I stumbled upon the idea of repurposing luggage as dog or cat beds. Repurposing can be approached differently depending on style preference. You can unscrew the hinges to detach the suitcase in two pieces (two beds, score!) or use it as one piece. Adding table legs may require more installation such as using metal plates, threads, screwdriver, and a drill. Create the bed using a pillow, cushion, or thick foam padding with comfortable fabric.

These faux-leather, plastic, metal luggage make the perfect bed for your pet. Personalize it with your pet’s name and favorite things!

Who do you think wore the pet bed better? Dogs or cats? Let us know at @arch_antiques!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

Mirror, mirror who’s the fairest of ‘em all? Check yourself out in this #ornate frame and beveled #mirror from the early 1900s.
Apr 14, 2014

Mirror, mirror who’s the fairest of ‘em all? Check yourself out in this #ornate frame and beveled #mirror from the early 1900s.

Apr 11, 2014

Uranium Glass

Architectural Antiques puts heart into quality light restoration – chandeliers, fixtures, sconces – and we believe we’re the best at it in Minnesota’s metropolitan area. We make old items come to life and we’re passionate about making every piece our best work. We recently restored a half-painted uranium bowl-glass chandelier salvaged from Youngstown, Ohio. Our light shop specialist, Will, mended the glass and stripped black paint off the exterior. We’re thrilled to have restored it to its original form.

Uranium glass was first produced in Europe in the 19th century as a technique for color yellow glass. Production was suspended for less than two decades during World War II due to toxic lead concern. It resumed after that period with low production of depleted uranium. Uranium glass radioactive levels are low and average in normal exposure.

Uranium glass adopted the name ‘Vaseline glass’ in the 20th century but the nickname is debatable. Although Vaseline glass and uranium glass have similar features, Vaseline glass has less uranium oxide content that creates transparency compared to opaque uranium glass with higher uranium oxide content. Due to chemical reaction, uranium glass glows pale green during daylight and fluoresces neon green or yellow-green under an ultra violet light or back light.

Despite emitting low levels of radioactive materials, early Europeans experimented with uranium glass and produced different colors. Antique uranium glass are aesthetic pieces embodying unique color. Look at the before-and-after pictures of the uranium chandelier and you’ll notice the difference in lighting and restoration.

What a difference! And it glows! Proved ourselves right that it’s #radioactive by lighting a regular bulb and an #uv bulb. Pure #uranium glass.
Apr 11, 2014

What a difference! And it glows! Proved ourselves right that it’s #radioactive by lighting a regular bulb and an #uv bulb. Pure #uranium glass.

Apr 9, 2014 / 5 notes

Last week we talked about creating a mini-garden using pop crates with pockets. There are many other innovative pop crate purposes. Examples we found include décor/accent, light bulbs, spice rack, arts and crafts materials, and dessert display. Sea shell and letter accents are nice additional touches to a washroom, bathroom, or hallway. The round light bulb idea is unique and striking – I can imagine it hanging on a ceiling or in a walk-in closet. A labeled spice rack mounted on the kitchen wall is great organization. It’s easy access during prepping and cooking a meal (no more opening cabinets!). Maybe you’ll even memorize where the spices are located on the crate. Arts and crafts supplies pile up and can get messy overtime. In a crate, they’re all in one place and can be sorted by colors, types of purpose, ribbons, threads, and trim. Pop crates make fun dessert holders and displays at outdoor events. However you choose to display them, they add a simple vintage touch.

Tweet us your favorite repurpose pop crate project or share one we don’t have here @arch_antiques!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

Apr 7, 2014

These are amazing pieces. Can’t believe we have a hundred different #foundry #molds and patterns. #industrial #steampunk #rustic

Apr 7, 2014 / 2 notes

Foundries were created in the 1700s by craftsmen and pattern makers. During the Industrial Revolution they became less popular due to high-efficient reproductive machinery. Foundry molds are handcrafted art and were used for steam engines and negatives to make iron parts for factory machines. The mold patterns are 2-dimensional/3-dimensional objects made out of wax, wood, plastic, or metal. Molds are industrial, steampunk designs of striking colors and unusual shapes. Mold designs can be simple or complex, and without careful removal after casting the mold can break. The molding process varies and depends on the type of foundry, metal, and casting. Mold processes include: sand casting, lost-foam casting, investment casting, ceramic mold casting, v-process, die casting, and billet casting. Metal casts result from melting metal into a liquid, pouring molten metal in a mold, and removing metal after it cools and has been solidified. Many wooden patterns are painted in black, red, yellow, or blue.

Antique foundry molds are getting harder and harder to find. They are unique, authentic pieces formed through a number of processes and craftsmanship. Foundry molds make great assembled, industrial art!

First five images are some foundry molds from Architectural Antiques. Call us at 612.332.8433 or email us at sales@archantiques.com for more information about our 100+ foundry molds!

- Yolei, Intern at Architectural Antiques

HeY that’s our dock
Apr 5, 2014 / 8 notes

HeY that’s our dock

Apr 4, 2014

New inventory, new layout - stop by and see the changes!

Not our typical inventory but super fun #antique #toys #fire
Apr 4, 2014 / 1 note

Not our typical inventory but super fun #antique #toys #fire

Apr 2, 2014

Two full truck loads of brand spanking new stuff from the other side of the country! #salvage #sneakpeak

Mar 31, 2014 / 21 notes

Trust me, Minnesotans, spring is coming — hopefully after the (final) snow showers this week. We’re ready to run away from seasonal affective disorder to soak up some sun. Spring and summer are packed with outdoor activities — camping, hiking, lakes, beaches, barbeques, picnics, and gardening. Pop crates are ideal to bring with on summer adventures as they serve many purposes. But say, how can pop crates with pockets be utilize other than stocking up classic-shaped glass pop? Outdoors or indoors, these pockets can be filled with plant, flower, herb, and cactus seeds. They look like a fun hobby to maintain because they are transportable and right in your hands. Enjoy the lush, vibrant outcome in a rustic antique crate!

What have you planted in a pop/soda crate? Tweet us a picture or memory at @arch_antiques! Our pop crates are on sale for $15/crate. Give us a call or email at 612.332.8433 and sales@archantiques.com if you’re interested!

- Yolei

The spotlight right here will do the trick. Once this magic white wall is completed it will have a full-time duty as a photo backdrop. #photography #painting
Mar 31, 2014 / 1 note

The spotlight right here will do the trick. Once this magic white wall is completed it will have a full-time duty as a photo backdrop. #photography #painting

Joe, our newest #lightshop addition, with his head magnifier. And Will, our light shop elitist, always brightening up the day.
Mar 28, 2014 / 1 note

Joe, our newest #lightshop addition, with his head magnifier. And Will, our light shop elitist, always brightening up the day.